How to soothe an autistic child

26.07.2020 By Vigis

how to soothe an autistic child

Helping Your Child with Autism Thrive

Provide your child with sensory toys that can help lower anxiety. You can actually buy sensory toys, but easy options range from soft "squeezy" balls to plasticine (soft clay), buzzers (helpful for some children), and more. Consider purchasing indoor or outdoor swings and trampoline. Soothe with the Senses Certain sensory tools can help relieve stress in a child with autism, so find out what works best for your students and keep these tools within reach. For example, they may feel soothed by squeezing a squishy ball of clay or fidgeting with a toy or other trinket. Others may enjoy rocking back and forth or bouncing.

When it comes to working with special needs children, such as those with an autism-spectrum disorder ASD autkstic, it's a good idea to acquire a special toolbox of strategies in addition to your autism certification. These efforts will help your students thrive and feel comfortable in the classroom setting. Kids with autism may quickly become over-stimulated and they may have difficulty coping in new situations or environments.

In these contexts, try some of the following techniques to ease their stress and restore calm to your classroom. Perhaps the best way to keep a child calm with autism is to limit their frustrations in the first place! When novel or out-of-the-box activities occur, wn to give the class advanced notice and instruction. Flapping of arms, having trouble sitting still, or raising their voices can signal distress in a student with autism.

If you notice these learning how to live again, have the child take several deep, calming breaths. You might even minimize anxiety by working deep breathing into the classroom routine, such as doing it with the whole class how do you cook a ribeye steak on the stove transitioning from one activity to another.

Certain sensory tools can help relieve stress in a child with autism, so find out what works best for your students and keep these tools within reach. For example, they may feel soothed by squeezing a squishy ball of clay or fidgeting with a toy or other trinket. Others may enjoy rocking back and forth or bouncing. Substitute large balls for chairs and the child may naturally be able to calm themselves by gently bouncing during class.

Classroom bodies can become too much at times for the student with ann. Set up an what clubs does tiger woods have in his bag for them to escape for quiet, such as a back corner of the classroom. Stock ear plugs, headphones, or weighted blankets for them to grab a moment of quiet.

Try out a autistc of these strategies to help your students with autism stay calm in the classroom. However, keep in mind that every childwith or without ASD is unique in their own way. Adjust your techniques as needed to best suit the individual needs of your students. Published by Alliant International University. Find Your Path Stick to a Routine Perhaps the best way to keep a child calm with autism is to limit their frustrations in the first place! Practice Deep Breathing Flapping of arms, having trouble sitting still, or raising their voices can signal distress in a student with autism.

Soothe with the Senses Certain sensory tools can help relieve stress in a child with autism, so find out what works best for your students and keep these tools within reach. Provide an Escape from Sensory Overload Classroom bodies can become too much at times for the student sn autism.

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Apparently your high-functioning autistic son experiences low-frustration tolerance and anger-control issues. Use the strategies below to (a) prevent emotional outbursts and (b) help calm your child down once he has launched into a tantrum or meltdown. Apr 18, Keep a few sensory tools or toys in your car or bag. You can offer these to your kid when their mind is overwhelmed. Kids have different favorites, but .

Last Updated: October 13, References Approved. She provides therapy to people who struggle with addictions, mental health, and trauma in community health settings and private practice.

There are 9 references cited in this article, which can be found at the bottom of the page. This article has been viewed , times. Autistic children are often overstimulated by things like touch, sound, and light.

They can also become overwhelmed and frustrated by unexpected events, such as changes in routine. Go to source Because autistic children often struggle to understand or communicate their experiences, they may have meltdowns. During a meltdown, a child may scream, flail wildly, destroy property, or even respond violently to others.

Autistic children can frequently become agitated, so it is important parents know how to calm them down. Every child is different so try several techniques to find the ones that work best for your child. Not necessarily! It might not be possible to avoid all meltdowns, but you can definitely try to reduce them.

Keep a written or digital log of your child's meltdowns. Use the log to look for patterns that might help you avoid them in the future. Guess again! A meltdown is when your child loses control due to a particular trigger, but a tantrum is thrown on purpose.

If you can identify your child's triggers, you can avoid meltdowns in the future. Read on for another quiz question. Try again! Meltdowns can be caused by both over-stimulation and break from routine. Your child might also experience a meltdown if they are frustrated or unable to communicate effectively.

Click on another answer to find the right one Why are deep pressure blankets often effective ways to soothe children during a meltdown?

Deep pressure blankets are not meant to be restrictive. The goal is to calm your child, not pin her down. Not quite! Deep pressure blankets won't directly impact your parent-child bond. If you'd like to be more involved in calming your child, try a deep pressure massage instead. Not exactly! Calming your child's meltdown is not the same as putting them to sleep.

It's okay if your child is still awake, as long as they feel soothed. Deep pressure techniques are used to reduce muscle tension, which can help your child calm down. In addition to blankets, you can try deep pressure massage or a pillow press. If your child is prone to hurting themselves during a meltdown, be careful to spin the chair slowly.

They might hurl themselves off and be harmed. Don't try to spin your child against their will. If your child feels trapped, they might hurt themselves while attempting to escape. Try again A gentle spinning motion may take the child's attention away from the trigger of the meltdown and serve as a healthy distraction. The goal of vestibular stimulation exercises is not to relax muscle tension.

If you think that would help your child, try a deep pressure exercise instead. Log in Social login does not work in incognito and private browsers.

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Learn why people trust wikiHow. Download Article Explore this Article methods. Tips and Warnings. Related Articles. Method 1 of Figure out what triggered the meltdown. Finding the cause can help you keep them away from whatever is upsetting them.

This is important in calming an autistic child. Observe your child and try to figure out the triggers for certain behaviors. Keep a notebook to record the child's common triggers will help you to prevent triggering meltdowns. You might also consider using a smartphone app to log meltdowns and their causes. Some common triggers for meltdowns in autistic children are changes or disruptions in their normal routine, overstimulation, frustration and communication difficulties.

Tantrums are thrown on purpose, as a power play, and will stop once you give in. Meltdowns occur when an autistic person becomes so stressed that they cannot control themselves, and they feel powerless and will not stop until it has run its course. Stick to a routine. When there is a routine to be followed, the child can predict what will happen next.

This helps to keep the child calm. Illustrated schedules can help the child visually see the routine for the day or week. If you know that there will be changes to the routine on a given day, make sure you take the time to prepare your child. Talk to them beforehand and communicate these changes clearly and patiently.

When introducing your child to a new environment, it best if you do it when there is less stimuli. This means bringing your child at a time when there is less noise or fewer people. Communicate clearly with your child. Verbal communication is a source of frustration for many autistic children.

Talk patiently, respectfully, and enunciate clearly. Avoid shouting or adopting an aggressive tone, as it may worsen the meltdown. If verbal communication is difficult for your child, try communicating through pictures or other forms of AAC. Always listen to your child, and make it clear that you value and respect what they have to say.

Ask them questions if you need clarification to prevent frustration-related meltdowns. When your child is upset, you can sometimes calm them down by diverting their attention.

Try playing enthusiastically with a favorite toy, watching a favorite video, or listening to a favorite song. If possible, involve their special interests. Distraction won't always work. For example, questions about your sister's rock collections might distract from her fears about getting a flu shot, but it won't fix things if her problem is that her dress seam feels like fire ants on her skin.

Once the child is calm again, it is a good idea to talk to them about what made them angry or stimulated them in the first place. Ask them what happened and work together to find ways to prevent it from reoccurring. Change the child's surroundings. Your child may be upset because they are hypersensitive and overstimulated. When this happens, it's a good idea to simply bring the child to a different environment , or to change the environment e.

For example, if your child experiences fluorescent lights as a trigger, it is better to take your child to a room with alternative lighting, rather than forcing the child to put up with it. If the child is in a location where the environment cannot easily be changed, take precautions. For example, you could give your child sunglasses to prevent hypersensitivity to light or earplugs to drown out noise to wear in public places.

Brainstorm precautions with your child. Give your child some space. Sometimes, children just need time before they feel ready to re-engage. Consider safety. Never leave a young child alone and unsupervised, or lock someone in a room. After the meltdown, discuss it with your child. Use a solution-based approach: instead of blaming or punishing your child, talk about ways to prevent meltdowns and better cope with stress.

How similar situations can be avoided in the future.