What is a child soldiers

07.01.2021 By Juzuru

what is a child soldiers

Child Soldiers

Jan 27,  · Child Soldiers Thousands of children are serving as soldiers in armed conflicts around the world. These boys and girls, some as young as 8 years old, serve in government forces and armed opposition. Child soldiers are boys and girls who are often abducted and used as combatants, forced to act as human shields or conduct executions, deployed as suicide bombers, or used to make or transport explosives. Other roles include working as guards, spies, messengers, porters, cooks or .

Today, there soldoers betweenandchildren fighting in the world. Their recruitment begins from the age of Child soldiers are used as instruments in war what are minions based on that execute even parents and friends. They have more energy than older people. They resist without feeling physical pain.

Lucien, 12, ex child soldier from the Democratic Republic of Congo 1. So they use stronger stuff, like drugs or money, to bait us and to make us march…I remember the attack on Njola-Kombouya village, in the south of Sierra Leone. They made us wake up at 1 in the morning and we marched until 7.

A doctor came. He had a small bowl of cold water, and, every two injections, he rinsed his needle in the water. It was always a small vial with red liquid. At first, I constantly felt weak and then after, I had how to win on mega millions lotto sense of overwhelming power, I felt myself capable of anything…I had rage, hate, I wanted to destroy everything.

A child soldier is a human being less than 18 years old, recruited by an army or simply participating in an armed conflict. In certain societies, children are considered adults from the age of 14 or A young person of 15 who joins an armed group can therefore be considered as an adult soldier according to his own culture.

Current international law in force fixes 15 years as the minimum age for recruitment in the army and participation in conflicts. However, the International Convention on the Rights of the Child fixes 18 as the age of adulthood. Whta child soldier is not only a member of an armed group who actively participates in hostilities. Children are recruited because they are more manageable, more cuild, and more easily manipulated than adults. Combined with questions of poverty, the lack of access to education or training, discrimination, and vulnerability, children are easy targets for recruitment by armed groups.

Children who are orphaned, unaccompanied or living in a difficult family environment, see it as a solution to their problems, and taking part in an armed group seems safer than confronting these iss. Revenge, community identity, and ideology can also influence children. As a result, children replace adults dead in combat. Recruitment of child soldiers is mostly voluntary, due to a combination of the multiple motivational factors mentioned above.

However, forced recruitment is a common and carefully planned process in which children are abducted and tortured. In cases of forced recruitment, the recruiters typically target places where children are most vulnerable and gathered in large numbers: in particular, children are abducted from schools, orphanages, refugee camps, stadiums, and churches.

Children are gauged according to their height and physical condition. They do that to see if they can trust you. I had to do it, otherwise I would have been killed. Colombie, boy recruited at 7 by whaat paramilitary group when he was a child in the streets. Child soldiers are usually presented as victims of adults, and forced recruitment is more readily emphasized than voluntary engagement. However, the majority of children choose to become soldiers and are real players of the conflicts.

The taboo of child soldiers for armies and the simplistic vision of the phenomenon in public opinion is a major challenge in resolving the problem, because it tends to want to grant a certain immunity to child soldiers, without accounting for the complexity of the problem and the conscious will of the child soldiers. Advocate for the protection of child rights by calling for an end to fires and deforestation in the Amazon Rainforest! Skip to content. Child Soldiers Today, there are betweenandchildren fighting in the world.

Definition of Child Soldier A child soldier is a human being chil than 18 years old, recruited by an army or simply participating in an armed conflict. The role what is a child soldiers child soldiers A child soldier is not only a member of an armed group who actively participates in hostilities.

Recruitment of child soldiers Recruitment of child soldiers is mostly voluntary, due to a combination of the multiple motivational factors mentioned above. Other focuses. Sign the petition.

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Feb 05,  · According to the Paris Principles on the Involvement of Children in Armed Conflict (), a child associated with an armed force (State military or security force) or armed group (non-State actors with arms engaged in conflict) refers to any person below 18 years of age who is, or who has been, recruited or used by an armed force or armed group in any capacity, including, but not limited to children, boys and girls, used as fighters, cooks, porters, spies or for sexual purposes. Child soldiers are any children under the age of 18 who are recruited by a state or non-state armed group and used as fighters, cooks, suicide bombers, human shields, messengers, spies, or for sexual purposes. In the last 15 years, the use of child soldiers has spread to almost every region of the world and every armed conflict. Apr 08,  · Child soldiers are children (individuals under the age of 18) who are used for military purposes. According to the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child and international human rights law, no child under 18 may be recruited into armed forces (government military) or armed rebel groups (militias and gangs).Author: Michelle Plett.

The United Nations reports that million girls and boys live in areas of the world affected by armed conflict. Despite being least responsible for the outbreak of violent conflict, children are disproportionately at risk of being affected by the violence and exploitation that occurs in war zones.

In , the Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child on the involvement of children in armed conflict OPAC came into force, defining the recruitment and use of children in conflict as a violation international law. When trying to end the scourge of child soldiers, it's necessary to work not only with armed forced and groups to end their recruitment practices, but also tackle the root causes and factors driving these push factors. Despite this, the UN verified in its most recent report that 7, children were recruited and used in 14 conflicts around the world.

Some child soldiers were as young as six years old. Children can become involved in armed conflicts in direct combat roles, but also in supporting roles — being forced or coerced to become cooks, cleaners, porters, intelligence gatherers and spies, wives, sex slaves, or used in acts of terror.

Regardless of their role, the experience for girls and boys is devastating. While many children are still forcibly recruited and used by armed forces or groups, research has found that socio-economic and circumstantial factors can push boys and girls into joining an armed group, left with no choice. Our research found these coercive "push" factors are most often related to the sense of safety or need for protection perceived by a child and his or her family, extreme poverty, hunger, lack of access to education, and lack of hope for the future — particularly in protracted conflicts.

As the world looks to end and prevent the use of child soldiers, it is crucial to address all the factors — including those that push children into armed groups. Strengthening the protective environment for children in fragile and conflict contexts and ensuring adequate resourcing of child reintegration programmes are both key factors to ending the recruitment and use of children.

Read our full policy recommendations here. According to the Paris Principles on the Involvement of Children in Armed Conflict , a child associated with an armed force State military or security force or armed group non-State actors with arms engaged in conflict refers to any person below 18 years of age who is, or who has been, recruited or used by an armed force or armed group in any capacity, including, but not limited to children, boys and girls, used as fighters, cooks, porters, spies or for sexual purposes.

Although child soldiers are often forcefully recruited, in a number of armed conflicts it is common for boys and girls to be "pushed" to join an armed force or group, out of fear, coerced, or when left with few other choices.

During times of protracted violence, when families are internally displaced or have to cross borders as refugees, communities are attacked, destroyed or occupied, or as families are internally displaced, their lives become chaotic and disruptive. This chaos can result in separation between family members, including children from their parents. The delicate networks that once offered protection and support to families are often irreparably damaged.

This separation leaves children without any means of safety or security, so they choose to become child soldiers as a form of protection. In situations areas of armed conflict, education facilities and personnel routinely face attack.

Schools often face interruptions or close entirely. Where families are displaced by conflict, access to education may be even more limited or non-existent.

We commissioned interviews with children affected by armed conflict, and found that when girls and boys can no longer safely access learning, they can begin to feel there is no hope for a job opportunity when they are older or for the future. For child soldiers, personal financial or familial economic situations rank high as a reason to join. When food and other resources become scarce, the alluring promise of barracks that offer a warm bed and readily available food is difficult to resist.

Conflict can destroy local economies and livelihoods. When families suffer loss of income, the pressure to survive can push parents and caregivers to urge their children to join an armed group — as a hope for the child to be fed by the group or earn an income to contribute to the family.

In times of uncertainty or displacement due to armed conflict, children often leave school, their homes, villages and even countries. These circumstances can lead to a sense of isolation. Joining an armed group and becoming a child soldier provides a sense of identity in that they now belong to a community, despite the level of risk and violence a child often knows they will experience.

Community members often feel pressure, or may even want, to play their part. As a result, elders, leaders, families or parents can pressure children to join an armed group — to gain protection, or to support a cause.

As well, other family members may already be involved in a conflict situation and children will recognise this as an opportunity for deeper connection. Although there are tens of thousands of boys and girls who have been recruited as child soldiers, statistics are difficult to come by.

The exact number is unknown as most data dates back nearly two decades. However, we do know that:. While the physical effects of being a child soldier are varied, the horrors of armed conflict leave long-lasting psychological, sociological and emotional effects on girls and boys.

As a child soldier, girls and boys will be forced to take actions and experience things in a way that denies their childhood and forces adulthood — actions and experiences that can lead psychological trauma for any individual, including adults. Children will often require substantial mental health and psychosocial support upon exiting an armed force or group, due to the violence they may participate in or witness, directly or indirectly.

Child soldiers can be ostracised by their parents, caregivers, families and communities, depending on the situation of their recruitment and their actions during the conflict. It is common to experience extreme forms of stigma that cut these children off from reuniting with their families and reintegrating back into society later.

Girls will almost always experience some form of sexual or gender-based violence, and can face the "double" stigma as a child soldier and survivor. These effects — physical and mental — and the barriers to services and support that stigma can create, can be devastating and lifelong without intervention or care.

At World Vision, we believe that all children should have the opportunity to experience life in all its fullness. Our strategies to end the recruitment and use of children by armed forces and armed groups are most effective when they are part of a comprehensive, multidisciplinary approach focused on the protection of the safety and rights of the child.

World Vision programming focuses on prevention by addressing the primary drivers of recruitment and strengthening the protective environment around children. By doing so, children are less susceptible to not only recruitment, but also other forms of violence, abuse, neglect and exploitation.

We offer reintegration programming to support former child soldiers, in line with our general child protection approach. We work to prevent children from being recruited into armed forces by strengthening child protection systems, promoting peacebuilding and increasing access to education and livelihood opportunities for entire communities.

We take a holistic, rights-based systems approach, addressing the root causes that can contribute to recruitment and use. We accomplish this through a variety of approaches, including:. The reintegration of children formerly associated with armed forces or armed groups into their families and communities is a crucial step for the well-being of former child soldiers and help prevent re-recruitment.

While solutions are complex, making a difference is not. Help advocate for change! Urge your government to take actions to implement this important international agreement. You can also support vulnerable children and their families through our Childhood Rescue initiative. Your donation will help provide life-saving essentials and support to children and families under the threat of abuse and exploitation in the world's most dangerous places.

Find out more about Childhood Rescue here. Our Work. Where We Work. When trying to end the scourge of child soldiers, it's necessary to work not only with armed forced and groups to end their recruitment practices, but also tackle the root causes and factors driving these push factors Today, States have signed and ratified the OPAC. What is a child soldier?

How are child soldiers recruited? These factors can include: Ongoing insecurity and displacement During times of protracted violence, when families are internally displaced or have to cross borders as refugees, communities are attacked, destroyed or occupied, or as families are internally displaced, their lives become chaotic and disruptive.

Lack of educational and employment opportunities In situations areas of armed conflict, education facilities and personnel routinely face attack. Poverty, lack of basic necessities and economic factors For child soldiers, personal financial or familial economic situations rank high as a reason to join. Poor sense of belonging or lack of familial relationships In times of uncertainty or displacement due to armed conflict, children often leave school, their homes, villages and even countries.

How many child soldiers are there? However, we do know that: In , the United Nations Secretary General reported that 7, children, some as young as six years old, had been recruited as child soldiers in the previous year.

In this same report , the UN verified that children were recruited and used in 14 armed conflicts that involved the recruitment and use of child soldiers. While the majority of perpetrators were non-State armed groups, 10 States were verified by the UN to still use child soldiers. What are the effects of being a child soldier?

What is World Vision doing about child soldiers? Prevention We work to prevent children from being recruited into armed forces by strengthening child protection systems, promoting peacebuilding and increasing access to education and livelihood opportunities for entire communities. We accomplish this through a variety of approaches, including: Prioritising Child Protection in humanitarian response , investing in community-based child protection systems that empower community and faith leaders, families, parents and children to monitor, report and refer child protection issues and concerns, and working to ensure comprehensive child protection services are available at local level to respond when children experience risks or forms of violence, abuse, neglect or exploitation.

Educating and empowering girls and boys as powerful agents of change, by providing opportunities for children to increase their decision-making and coping skills, and by promoting peace and social cohesion. Strengthening families and caregivers to be the first line of protection and care for children by growing social support networks, and linking them to humanitarian assistance, including food and economic support, and services and systems designed to help families cope in situations of conflict and crisis.

Partnering with communities to address the root causes of violence against children, including inequality, inadequate social protection systems, lack of economic opportunity, conflict and instability, and harmful attitudes, beliefs and practices that tolerate and spread violence. Reintegration The reintegration of children formerly associated with armed forces or armed groups into their families and communities is a crucial step for the well-being of former child soldiers and help prevent re-recruitment.

Older children were also supported with vocational training to help open doors for the future. In Central African Republic , World Vision has connected with peer NGOs, academia and the private sector in a ground-breaking partnership to protect children from the worst forms of labour, including child recruitment and use, supporting local communities to advocate and act to create change.

In the Democratic Republic of Congo, through the Rebound Project children were supported to reintegrate into community life through the provision of psychosocial support, life skills classes and basic vocational training. At the end of the programme, participants were provided with small grants to start businesses. How can I help? Twitter Facebook LinkedIn.