What is patient group direction

20.04.2021 By Tojagrel

what is patient group direction

SPS - Specialist Pharmacy Service

Dec 13,  · A Patient Group Direction (PGD) is a written instruction for the sale, supply and/or administration of medicines to groups of patients who may not be individually identified before presentation for treatment. Patients may or may not be identified, depending on the circumstances. Patient Group Directions (PGDs) provide a legal framework that allows some registered health professionals to supply and/or administer specified medicines to a pre-defined group of patients, without them having to see a prescriber (such as a doctor or nurse prescriber).

These two documents have the potential to make a huge impact on current practice of nurses and professionals allied to medicine. The documents legalise a practice many have found desirable - that of professionals being able to administer and supply medication directly to patients within a protocol.

Nothing new here, you might say. It is widely acknowledged that family planning nurses have issued medication under such protocols, as have school nurses, delivering vaccinations to large groups of clients. However, the legality of such practice was questioned.

The real difficulty was that it was impossible to identify and name the individual patient beforehand, and therefore the supply was potentially illegal under the act. Protocols, which specify the name of the patient, are likely to have been within the law. The legal definition is contained in SI No PGDs for the supply or administration of medicines should in all cases ensure that patient safety is not compromised or put at risk.

Such directions should also take account of patient ia and patient convenience. They should gdoup clear arrangements for professional responsibility and accountability and contribute to the effective use of resources. In all cases they should be consistent with the summary of product characteristics, which is part of the marketing authorisation granted for the product. Black triangle vaccines used in immunisation programmes maybe included in patient group directions. If a drug is used outside its license then the reason for its use and justification should be included.

Controlled drugs are presently excluded. PGDs should be drawn up by a multidisciplinary group that should include a doctor, a pharmacist and a representative of any professional group expected to utilise the PGD.

Essential criteria include the following:. Personal accountability will remain with the individual professional. There is patisnt requirement for practitioners to be named individually.

Additionally there should be a clear auditing system patent place. PGDs are quite distinct from nurse prescribing. It is only possible to issue or administer a medicine within a very tight framework whatever happened to the great escape medicine must be included in the PGDs.

The individual supplying or administering them must be specifically authorised to do so. The professionals covered by the statutory instrument are:. Obviously PGDs will only come in to how to propagate an aloe plant with the agreement of employers. The medical profession and pharmacists will be key players, and their cooperation is essential to successful implementation.

There are benefits to all, as the service to patients is streamlined and improved. Providing practitioners work within the patient group directions and their professional code there is little likelihood of legal action.

Practitioners remain professionally accountable to their how to fix refrigerator door not closing body, to their employer and to the law. PGDs will allow the right treatment to be instigated by the right professional at the right time.

The opportunity pagient include all those drugs needed to practise effectively can be considered for inclusion. The only limitation is the professional will to make it happen. Nurses should grasp the opportunity with both hands and make this piece of legislation as well known as their code of professional conduct. Hurwitz, B. Negligence, Discretion and Judgement. London: Radcliffe. Sign in or Register a new account to join the discussion.

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Definitions and guidance

Patient Group Directions (PGDs) are documents in the U.K. National Health Service that permit the supply of prescription-only medicines to groups of patients, without individual prescriptions. Feb 28,  · What are patient group directions (PGDs)? These are ‘written instructions for the supply or administration of medicines to groups of patients who may not be individually identified before presentation for treatment’, according to HSC /

Patients may or may not be identified, depending on the circumstances. For example, a baby being presented for immunisations who has already had earlier immunisations at the same practice so their attendance could have been expected.

The supply and administration of medicines under PGDs should be reserved for those limited situations where this offers an advantage for patient care without compromising patient safety, and where it is consistent with appropriate professional relationships and accountability.

PGDs are not a form of prescribing. The health care professional working within the PGD is responsible for assessing that the patient fits the criteria set out in the PGD. Organisations should have policies and processes in place to consider all aspects of medicines management for patients within the service or pathway.

Before a service is designed or commissioned using PGDs and before a PGD is developed, you must ensure that PGDs are appropriate, legal, and that relevant governance arrangements are in place. The first stop for professional medicines advice. About Contact Email off You are not signed in. Sign in to check you are receiving email updates.

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For groups of patients who have not previously presented to e. In well established services where assessment and treatment follows a clearly predictable pattern e.

NHS immunisation clinics and contraception and sexual health services.